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Discussion Starter #1
Last night a friend and I put two new sprockets and a rivet chain on my bike. I don't have pictures this time, so I'll do my best to explain.

First, let me say that I can not express enough how invaluable the shop manual is. I'm absolutely sure that my bike would still be in pieces in the garage had I not had the manual available.

Next, having the right tools for the job is just as important. We had to go to Advance Auto Parts 3 times and Home Depot once for the tools needed to carry out the mission.

Tools list:
Metric Alen wrench set
1/4" and 1/2" ratchet drivers
Plyers
Vice Grip
10/14mm open ended wrench
Locktite
3' cast iron pipe
3' hardwood dowel
Lithium grease
Engine Degreaser
Simple Green
Chain Break
Chain Press
36mm socket for axel nut (included in bike toolkit)


Getting down to the nity grity. The preparation work was pretty easy. I removed the left side fairing, pipe, hugger and sprocket cover so that getting the wheel off would be as easy a process as possible. The speedo sensor and gear shift lever are mounted to the sprocket cover and need to be removed before the cover is taken off.

After removing the sprocket cover it was clear what 2 years and 14,000 miles worth of chain lube and road grime can do. There was so much grease and dirt caked inside the cover that you could reach in and scoop out hardy portions with a spoon if you wanted to. After scraping the excess out and 2 cans of engine degreaser the sprocket, clutch and cover were clean enough to start working.

With all the body work removed and the engine cleaned up, we removed the speed sensor drive mounted to the sprocket, then we began to loosen the engine sprocket with a 1/2" driver and a 32mm socket. The sprocket is locktited on and torqued to 80ft lbs, so we used a cast iron fence post pipe over the ratchet for leverage. Scottq earlier suggested that we use a 2x4 between the swing arm and the wheel and put the transmission in neutral to avoid putting all that weight on the gears. We used a 1 1/4" dowel. The OEM chain stretched quite a bit while we were loosening the sprocket.

After that we began to break the chain. Important info for first timers. The pins to not push all the way through. Just push the two pins enough to break free of the outside plate that links both inside ends together. The plate falls off and the back plate will slide out the back with the pins attatched. We spend a good hour trying to figure out why the chain was bending and why we couldn't push the pin all the way through. It was retarded.

After getting the chain off we took the rear wheel off which is simple enough. Using the toolkit included with the bike and the cast iron pipe for leverage we loosened the axel nut. The axel has a couple of collars and two washers that need to be kept track of. Use the shop manual for info.

With the wheel off we were able to remove the rear sprocket with a 14mm socket and replaced it with the new one. This was a painless process. After cleaning and regreasing the axel and colars we put the rear wheel back on the bike with some locktite on the threads.

The front sprocket was even easier. With the nut already loose we were able to quickly replace the sprocket and loosely put the nut back on.

We set the rear wheel to be fairly close to the front, more than it was when stock and pulled the chain through. The chain measurement is pretty much done by eye. We cut the chain to length and put the master link on. The chain came with both a clip and a rivet plate. Then, we finished by pressing the rivet plate over the pins, tightening down the engine sprocket, setting chain sag and aligning the wheel.

It's a much simpler job than I had originally thought, but it would have been impossible without the manual and the right tools. A little know how (regarding the silly chain break process) would've been helpfull too.
 

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What did you use for a Chain Break/Rivet tool?

Good write-up! I hope to do my own this winter. :thumb
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I used motion-pro chain break and press tools. It's obviously specialized and cost about $20. The chain press tool is also specialized, but very, very simple.

You can see the press tool here. It's the forth image down. The little, all black tool with no handle. We kept the chain from moving around by having my friend hold the back end of the press with a pair of plyers while I worked the plate over the rivets.
 
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