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58 gal. oceanic tank, 50+lb of live rock. had this set up about 3 years. tomato clown, blue damsel, really nice marine beta (but i gotta coax him out to get a pic-hes 5 years old and hides in the rocks like a grouper or somthing).
 

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another
 

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NYSteve said:
looks great! all im gonna say is it's a damn expensive hobby,but you know that by now:D
initially yes, but once its up and running its not bad. just do monthly water changes, watch salinity, ph, alkalinity. lots of this stuff with enriched salt fixes itself. also depends on what corals you wanna have. the ones i have are all pretty tough. tried some clams and xenia and they were too delicate for me. i have spent maybe 20 bucks on this in 5 months but its almost time for new VHO bulbs. $95 bucks for the 3.
 

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Very nice!
 

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My friend has a saltwater tank. it;s very cool, and very colorful. I could just sit and watch it for hours. He has spent thousands of dollars on it.
 

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NYSteve said:
btw what type of filter system u running?
Most reef tanks run a Berlin style system in which the natural bacteria in the rock and sand filter the tank. With that and your monthly water changes no other type of biological system is needed. Well you should use a protien skimmer too. Things like under gravel filters and wet dry filters have too many bad effects to be worth any use in reef keeping. BTW, nice tank man. Here is a pic of my 150 gallon reef. Its mostly stony corals like Acroporas and Montiporas, but I have a few other things in there. Its about 3 years old. This tank is expensive because the amount of lighting the stonies require as well as the pumps for the huge water flow they need. This tank cost roughly 15,000 dollars as it sits and takes about 50-100 bucks a motnh to maintain including the electric bill for the lights. If anyone here is looking for a good reefkeeping discussion board, try reefs.org. Very sound advice over there. I have been in reefs for 8 years now and laerned everything I know from those guys.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
WickedGixxer1K said:
Most reef tanks run a Berlin style system in which the natural bacteria in the rock and sand filter the tank. With that and your monthly water changes no other type of biological system is needed. Well you should use a protien skimmer too. Things like under gravel filters and wet dry filters have too many bad effects to be worth any use in reef keeping. BTW, nice tank man. Here is a pic of my 150 gallon reef. Its mostly stony corals like Acroporas and Montiporas, but I have a few other things in there. Its about 3 years old. This tank is expensive because the amount of lighting the stonies require as well as the pumps for the huge water flow they need. This tank cost roughly 15,000 dollars as it sits and takes about 50-100 bucks a motnh to maintain including the electric bill for the lights. If anyone here is looking for a good reefkeeping discussion board, try reefs.org. Very sound advice over there. I have been in reefs for 8 years now and laerned everything I know from those guys.
VERY nice tank.. 3x the size of mine. your lighting alone, like you said, is necessary for the amount and type of corals as well as the size of the tank. that IS a labor of love.
i have the basic wet/dry trickle filter with the bio-balls and a protien skimmer. good 2" of crushed coral in the bottom for biological activity. that and the live rock i understand also acts as a filter.
live rock is about $5-8 bucks a lbs, and any decent coral is 30$ and up.
what can i do to get rid of some the the wavey algea i have on my rock???
 

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Those are some beautiful tanks. Me and a friend were just talking about how difficult these things are. I may try to just get a freshwater tank going just for something to have. The good old box filter and some swordtails:D Actually not sure what I would go with.

Tom
 

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Yeah man, trickle filters are bad news on tanks. They tend to cause more problems than they are worth. They can cause the nitrate levels in a reef to stay fairly high. Plus, you don't want aerobic bacteria doing the filtration in your tank like a wet dry does. You want anaerobic bacteria like in rock and the sand bed. As long as you have enough live rock and a good skimmer, you will be fine. The sand bed in my tank is 5 inches deep, and thats a huge surface area for bacteria. You said you had some algae? Have you tested your water for phosphates? That tends to be the number one cause, nitrates can too tho. If you are not using reverse osmosis water in your tank you can get a high phosphate level. I would have to see it, but there is one type of algae that is freakin impossible to kill. Its called bryopsis. You don't wanna go messing with an established tank, but if you ever set up a new tank use aragonite sand on the bottom instead of crushed coral. The pH level on the bottom of an aragonite bed gets low enough to slowly dissolve the sand and it helps to maintain calcium levels. I have to use a calcium reactor on my tank and its still hard to keep the level up because of all the stonies. That tank is a labor, it also a pain in the ass, but people's jaws drop when they come in my house and see it. That pic doesn't do it justice at all. It takes up a whole wall in my living room. Oh I went back and looked at your aglae. Looks like hair algae from the pic. Try checking your water chemistry for phosphates and nitrates. If either check out high do some small water changes till it comes down. You can get a good herbivore fish taht will eat it too. Tangs like the green stuff, especially yellows and sailfins.
 

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:hail Man you guys have some awsome tanks. I have two 20 gallons, one I dont even use anymore cause I always seem to get lazy fish. I have tried to start a great looking tank but it never works out. kept an eye on the nitrate level ph level and stuff but damn it never seems to last longer than a week.

My tank just turns green almost over night. Currently have 3 algae eaters 2 different kinds, and one sits in one spot all the time, and the others just chase each other around the tank all day, and night. :shrug

Maybe it wasn't ment to be for me to have fish or anything. I have my iguana who hates me, but loves my g/f go figure. I even built him a condo which stands in my living room a good 7ft tall 6ft wide, and 4ft deep.

still you guys have some awsome tanks....:biggrin2

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #18
tommymac said:
Those are some beautiful tanks. Me and a friend were just talking about how difficult these things are. I may try to just get a freshwater tank going just for something to have. The good old box filter and some swordtails:D Actually not sure what I would go with.

Tom
this is a GREAT way to go. the fish are pretty cheap. neons, assorted tetras, sword tails, angel fish. can be a real nice tank. had this kinda set up for years.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Krypt Keeper said:
:hail Man you guys have some awsome tanks. I have two 20 gallons, one I dont even use anymore cause I always seem to get lazy fish. I have tried to start a great looking tank but it never works out. kept an eye on the nitrate level ph level and stuff but damn it never seems to last longer than a week.

My tank just turns green almost over night. Currently have 3 algae eaters 2 different kinds, and one sits in one spot all the time, and the others just chase each other around the tank all day, and night. :shrug

Maybe it wasn't ment to be for me to have fish or anything. I have my iguana who hates me, but loves my g/f go figure. I even built him a condo which stands in my living room a good 7ft tall 6ft wide, and 4ft deep.

still you guys have some awsome tanks....:biggrin2

Dave

might be the water. you can NOT use tap water to mix with you salt. must have a reverse osmosis filter, or buy RO water from a reputable fish place/store. sure they would check your water for nitrite/nitrate, ph, other stuff but this was a problem i was having for a while too due to bad water.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
WickedGixxer1K said:
Yeah man, trickle filters are bad news on tanks. They tend to cause more problems than they are worth. They can cause the nitrate levels in a reef to stay fairly high. Plus, you don't want aerobic bacteria doing the filtration in your tank like a wet dry does. You want anaerobic bacteria like in rock and the sand bed. As long as you have enough live rock and a good skimmer, you will be fine. The sand bed in my tank is 5 inches deep, and thats a huge surface area for bacteria. You said you had some algae? Have you tested your water for phosphates? That tends to be the number one cause, nitrates can too tho. If you are not using reverse osmosis water in your tank you can get a high phosphate level. I would have to see it, but there is one type of algae that is freakin impossible to kill. Its called bryopsis. You don't wanna go messing with an established tank, but if you ever set up a new tank use aragonite sand on the bottom instead of crushed coral. The pH level on the bottom of an aragonite bed gets low enough to slowly dissolve the sand and it helps to maintain calcium levels. I have to use a calcium reactor on my tank and its still hard to keep the level up because of all the stonies. That tank is a labor, it also a pain in the ass, but people's jaws drop when they come in my house and see it. That pic doesn't do it justice at all. It takes up a whole wall in my living room. Oh I went back and looked at your aglae. Looks like hair algae from the pic. Try checking your water chemistry for phosphates and nitrates. If either check out high do some small water changes till it comes down. You can get a good herbivore fish taht will eat it too. Tangs like the green stuff, especially yellows and sailfins.
thanks for the advice. my filter is a wet/dry (not sure why i said trickle). i had the hair algae once, real tough bristly type you cant even pull off the rock. the stuff i have is real soft and you can pull clumps off the rock or where ever its growing (and its growing all over). for about 5 months i got lazy and was not watching my alkalinity. got about 1/2 of where it should. did a water change and have been adding buffer every couple days to get it up. the fish store said nitrite levels were fine and there was no amonia. ill see how it goes.
later.
 
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