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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright ladies... as most of you might know... I am a MSF ridercoach... well the state coordinator has asked me to do a speech on sunday at the update. I am just looking for *positive* ;) opinions about what you liked about the class and what was done to make you more comfortable. All comments are appreciated! Thanks ahead of time ladies!
 

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I never noticed it in your signature before. ;)

It's been a while since I went (1999)... I might have to give it some thought.

* Geared toward beginners, never feel push beyond my limits.
* No yelling/negative comments.
* Good balance of classroom/lecture and hands-on practice time.
 

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SPODE in training
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I went in 2003 and between the 2 instructors I was SO glad I had mine! With our groups split, my group noticed that the other instructor was always yelling negative comments to his group. My instructor was awesome - very patient with everyone :)

There were also a couple of people who were real beginners that he took to the side to give them a little more instruction so they could get the excercise right.
 

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I went to bed at 8 and got home at 11
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I have to say, the first time I took it, the instructors were so negative towards any female in the class I could've sworn their penis' were an inch long (and that's erect!).

They asked every girl in the class to leave. Guess that was one way of getting money out of people. Then again, that "school" lost their license to teach MSF. Karma! :flame

The second time I took the class, I couldn't have asked for nicer instructors. :clap :thumb

I guess what I would say I liked best about the class was the positive re-enforcement they gave to EVERYONE. Including this one girl that dropped her bike. They really tried to talk her into staying.
 

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Obey The Pug
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i loved my msf. my instructors were really nurturing. the coaches really tried hard to give us individual attention on the exercises we had problems on.

i remember i had a hard time with the figure eights so my instructor would run to the opposite side of where i was, everytime i was trying to turn and yell, look at me look at me! He was trying to get me to look way over my shoulder so the bike would turn.
 

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I took it last spring and I loved how patient the instructors were. They were always eager to stop whatever we were doing to answer whatever questions we had. Also, I know a lot of people didn't like it but I liked how reptitious the pratice drills were. It definitely got into my head. :)

Good luck, Jamie!
 

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Crazy like a fox...
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Even though I already knew how to ride when I took it, they didn't make me feel frustrated (in that way of "I already know this crap") when we started from "this is the throttle. This is the brake. Now duck-walk the bike....." They taught us exactly what we needed to know, and told us "this is what you'll be tested on". Patience was key :)
 

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I had never driven a bike before the course. I was also pregnant! :laughing

Anyway, I love the approach. They start you off SLOW - pushing the bike to get a feel for it, etc etc..

Pushing on the handle bars and looking through the turns are 2 of the favorite things I learned.

I never felt pushed, not once.

One day they put an object on top of a fence to see who noticed the change in the course. That helped me remember to LOOK for the unexpected while riding (and driving my car!)

Being taught to ANTICIPATE that the cage driver WILL/MAY come over on you, cut you off, etc etc. keeps you on your toes! They didn't say they would - just to be prepared that they would.

How would I possibly know all that without the course? Probably through trial and error!! :eek Not the way I would like to learn it!

They encouraged women - there were plenty of us too.

To have a course available and be able to learn from a course rather than fellow riders (whom you have no idea their experience) is a valuable LIFE saving MUST!!!!

Nicole
 

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(Ack, I gotta be careful, since my Ridercoach is a member of this forum! :citadel)

No, seriously.... I enjoyed my class because they made it FUN. The cameraderie between the instructors was very apparent, and it was all about making everything fun -- both the class time and the riding portion. I felt like they watched us very closely, and worked with each member of the class on individual areas they felt we needed to work on.

As Snaps said, we were told specifically what we'd be tested on, so we knew exactly what to focus on.
 

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My ridercoaches were a father/son duo which provided a great balance between older wisdom and younger spirit.

The best thing about the both of them was that they were confident in US, the students. From the get-go they were FOR SURE none of us were going to fail (there were 5 of us in all, and all with different riding backgrounds and intentions). Going into the class I was a bit worried that it was going to be a tense array of lessons - similar to learning to drive with a parent who is convinced you're going to wreck the car and kill everyone within a mile radius. However, they were all out confident with us.

Their one-on-one work was astounding. Every segment of the class - videos, written work, teaching us about the bikes, teaching us while we were on the bikes, and testing - was engaging. No one slipped through the cracks. There was no hesitation with helping anyone out with anything. They even allowed us, the students, to help each other if we noticed someone having a difficult time. It was a great sense of brother/sisterhood that they enforced.
 

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I think the MSF course is a must for beginner and experienced riders. For beginners, it is a great way to see if riding is for you and to learn the basic lessons necessary for safe riding. For experienced riders, the MSF course helps strengthen skills and corrects bad habits.

When I took the course, I took it with my husband. He had been riding for 15+ years and I had never ridden except as a passenger. We both learned things. I learned that I looooved riding and never really wanted to be a passenger again. I also made lots of mistakes in a safe environment -- dropping the bike, scraping my footpegs -- and I am glad I didn't have to learn those lessons on the street.

The best part for me was that at the end, I beat my husband on the riding test! I think the difference was that I was "a clean slate" and he was trying to unlearn a few bad habits. In the curvy part of the test, I scraped my footpeg (I do love to lean) and because I had learned what to do in class, I just accelerated right out of it and got a perfect score on that skill.

What a great experience! :clap
 

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My instructors were great. I had a man and a woman on the first day and then a different woman with the same man on the next day. they were helpful without being condescending and although a few people didn't pass, they were good at explaining to them what they needed practice on. I also appreciated that when a few of the men would make remarks about my friend and I(the only two women in the class) they would step up and put them in their place by expalining that women are generally easier to teach because they don't come into the class acting as if they knew everything. Point of interest is that the two guys that were making derogatory remarks about women on bikes, were also two of the ones that failed. Guess they should have paid more attention to the class then us.
 

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My MSF course was awesome. I'd ridden on the back of bikes off and on my whole life, pretty much any time I got the opportunity. But as excited as I was to ride a bike for the first time, I was also very nervous and scared. I LOVED that they had you sit on the bikes with them off first. Touch the levers. Flip them on and off. Understand what they're for. Then we "walked" them, while off, straddled, etc. It was a very comfortable "ease you into it" process, and it was better than I could have asked for! By the time we actually started up the bikes and actually put them in gear, I was no longer nervous or scared! The instructors were great about showing you what they wanted before expecting you to do it, and gave individual feedback to every rider. They were friendly, personable, and knowledgeable, but were no-nonsense in that if you started goofing off, you got lectured/warned. I would (and do!) recommend it to ANYbody that is thinking about riding.
 

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I think the test to get a license at the end should be harder. One guy who passed in my beginners class is going to kill himself or someone else on the road (probably did already). He dropped his bike during the practice part but managed not to drop it during the test (although came very close) and so he passed...

I am so glad I traveled out of my area to take the class so maybe I will be spared and never run into him on the road.

Also the whole signup thing is a pain in the rear. I drove 1.5 hours because I was 1st on the waiting list and apparently had "a great chance of getting in" but every damn person showed up that day and I had to turn right back around and go home. I was soo pissed because I took off of work to take that class and the women assured me I would get in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
whoa that sucks... here in pa.. its either your register online or by phone... sorry you had that bad experience:(
 

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I had a great experience. It was an "all women" class taught by two female instructors. Sandy, the lead instructor, was very thorough but tough. She explained that women learn differently, more nurturing, less put down. On the course, she was great, giving us the little tips to ride better. Vic, the other instructor, was great too. On the riding course, both of them pointed out our faults but were quick to help you correct your error and give encouragement. I didn't think I could go over the obstacle (4x4) on the track. They kept cheering me on and on the second try, I went over. What a great feeling and everyone was cheering. It doesn't get much better than that. On the test, they made me redo a section because I was, get this, too slow! :crackup But I did okay and passed the course!

Robert's a great teacher, don't get me wrong. But, being his girlfriend, I got nervous and was worried that I wouldn't meet his expectations. (I've managed to drop my bike twice because of nerves.) During the class, I was nervous but so was everyone else. We helped each other through it and it gave me the confidence I needed to go back to the parking lot with Robert and work on the skills.

It's a MUST DO for every rider as far as I'm concerned. Plus, I met some new friends and we have a common interest...RIDING!!!!

I just wish the cost in every state was the same. In GA, it's about $300.00 to take the class. I heard it's free in PA.

A friend of mine is a MSF ridercoach in Johnstown. Ever met Rick Schubert? He rides a '04 Harley Roadking. We ride together when I go see my best friend/his sister, in Homer City.
 

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MSF

I took MSF approx 2-years ago. The improvements I would like to see would be the folowing:

1) Treat everyone as if they have never seen a bike before or at least divide up the class between the experienced and the total layman.
2) Be approachable (Instructors and students allike)
3) Be willing to encourage rather than discourage. If you have a student who is struggling with a manuever, work with them instead of telling them to "just do it!" If they could "just do it" they wouldn't need to be in the class.

Thanks for listening.:D
 

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ditto on the last reply;

I had ridden street for 2 years. Dirt all my life,
but my husband was a beginner. He had feet
flying off the pegs type of dirt skills and no street.

We went together and I was amazed at the
confidance he gained at MSF because;

1. They treated him like he had never seen a bike
before, re taught him clutch, brake and balance
basics.

2. Positive reinforcement. You can do it attitude.
A pat on the back by a complete stranger who
he automatically regarded as a professional really
focused him.

3. Repeating the SIPDE or SEE strategy showed him
how to be safe.

These things I would have assumed a rider already knew.
Being in a classroom environment saved him years of mistakes.
 
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