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Homeslice said:
And yet according to the common "wisdom" on CF, California is a pinko-commie state that should not only have inspections but the toughest ones in the country.

:laughing so true.....other than guns this state is lax about everything. The mid-atlantic is more pinko-commie than here.






I do have to bitch though.....I have to take my truck in to get weighed of all things before I can get Cali plates.
 

· Soul Man
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8,385 Posts
Re: Re: Getting a bike inspected in MD <rant>

ducati_atx said:
take it to a junky ass shop in a sketchy neighborhood and get it inspected there. Trust me, they wont fine tooth comb your reflectors and whatnot.

When I went for an inspection on my '68 BSA, the guy told me it would not pass because it had no turn signals, no horn, no reflectors, and no VIN number (bikes made in those days had frame and engine numbers).

I pointed out to him that the bike did not come stock with any of that stuff, so by law, I didn't need it. I had to show him the law in the fucking DMV handbook. Dipshit.

The guy that does my inspections now, doesn't even look at my bikes any more. I hand him money, he hands me stickers.

Hole in the wall shops are the way to go.

JC
 

· Hayabusa Madness
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
After going to another inspection site, and failing for the same ridiculous reason, it's clear that the only way I'll be able to get my bike to pass a Maryland state inspection is to replace the OEM undertail, fender, rear turn signals and rear brake light. I found a guy online who wanted $48 for his used undertail (uncut) with the turn signals still attached, so that leaves me just needing to get a rear brake light (they have a few on ebay) and I can start putting the OEM parts back on. What a royal pain.

At first I thought what I might do is go to the Suzuki service dept. that did the orginal inspection and bring all the OEM parts and just tell them to: install the parts, inspect the bike, and, after it passes the inspection, to remove all the OEM parts and put the bike back the way it was when I brought it in. But the cost would be at least $300, and if they had any sense at all they'd just give the bike a pass on the inspection, charge me for the work, and save their mechanics 6 hours of needless effort. Of course, if they had any sense at all they wouldn't be failing the bike because the LED lights in the rear don't have the raised DOT letters on the lenses.
 

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Unregisturd said:
No bike inspections in CA.
even if you buy a used bike and need to get it registered?

in any case, i got pulled over for speeding, and they cited me for not having rear blinkers or a visible plate (was tucked up by rear wheel). i had to throw on all the stock equipment and take it to the local PD to get it cleared. paid $10 and was on my way.
 

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It sucks, but you failed the inspection. Why try and argue the fact?

I used to work at a state inspection center for 2 years and people would fail all the time for non DOT lights. Of course they immediately became an expert on the law and tried to talk their way out of it. This never worked. The only thing it did was piss off the inspector. The punishment for passing a vehicle that doesn't meet the standards is very harsh in Hawaii. 10k dollar fine and a 90 day suspension.

Like I said, it sucks, but what's the point of arguing it?
 

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Huh.. never haqd that problem in that past 15+ years. Only bought one bike new, bought 5 other "new to me" bikes and had to have them inspected. Went to the local garage and they ran it thru no problems. Methinks you just need to go somewhere less strict--- or pay a little extra to get some leniency.
 

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FWIW, most states do not require turn signals on a bike, but if they are there, they must work.

Consider just taking off the turn signals and then getting an inspection? Check MD law first, though.
 

· Hayabusa Madness
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
There are two sets of laws in most states, as there is in the federal government. The first set of laws are passed by the legislature often referred to as the Title, or Code. The second set of laws are administrative regulations, and although not passed by the legislature still have the force of law. Although criminal charges usually cannot be brought with violations to administrative regulations, there may still be stiff fines.

In Maryland, for example, the state law says that motorcycles are not required to have electric turn signals.
Maryland State Law
Consequently, a police officer in Maryland cannot legally issue you a citation for not having electric turn signals on your motorcycle.

Turning quickly to the Maryland COMAR (Code of Maryland Regulations) it states..."Reject any vehicle if: (2) Turn signals do not properly indicate right and left when so switched."

Located at...COMAR for lights on motorcycles

With regard to motorcycle lights, the Handbook for Motorcycle Inspections in the state of Maryland states at 11.14.03.08 #10, "Reject any vehicle if: Any lamp, lens, or reflector is not an approved type."

It does not state anywhere in the Handbook or anywhere in the COMAR where this approval can be found. The Administrator of Maryland DOT is provided the authority later on in the COMAR to approve all equipment for motor vehicles in Maryland. Unfortunately, once again the COMAR fails to state where this approval can be found, or how it will be determined. One would assume that the Administrator keeps a list of approved equipment including lamps, lenses, and reflectors.

However, that isn't the case. Instead the Maryland State Police have informed all the Inspection Stations to look for the raised DOT letters, which they claim is approval by the US DOT. They are wrong. The US DOT does not have the authority to approve vehicles or equipment. The US DOT, under the NHTSA, sets standards for new and imported vehicles. With regard to lights and lighting equipment they determine candle power (lumen) and color of lenses to be used. They set standards on where this equipment will be located, generally.

The raised "DOT" letters are placed on equipment by the manufacturer attesting to the manufacturer's certification that their equipment is in conformity with US law and the CFR (Code of Federal Regulations), it is not an approval by the US DOT.

Here is a letter from the Chief Counsel of the NHTSA stating that DOT raised letters do not provide approval by US DOT, on page 2, the highlighted part...US DOT Letter

What's more, there is no requirement for cars, trucks or buses in Maryland to be rejected by the inspector if "lamps, lenses or reflectors are not approved." This would seem to be discriminatory against motorcyclists, for no good reason.
 

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There are two sets of laws in most states, as there is in the federal government. The first set of laws are passed by the legislature often referred to as the Title, or Code. The second set of laws are administrative regulations, and although not passed by the legislature still have the force of law. Although criminal charges usually cannot be brought with violations to administrative regulations, there may still be stiff fines.

In Maryland, for example, the state law says that motorcycles are not required to have electric turn signals.
Maryland State Law
Consequently, a police officer in Maryland cannot legally issue you a citation for not having electric turn signals on your motorcycle.

Turning quickly to the Maryland COMAR (Code of Maryland Regulations) it states..."Reject any vehicle if: (2) Turn signals do not properly indicate right and left when so switched."

Located at...COMAR for lights on motorcycles

With regard to motorcycle lights, the Handbook for Motorcycle Inspections in the state of Maryland states at 11.14.03.08 #10, "Reject any vehicle if: Any lamp, lens, or reflector is not an approved type."

It does not state anywhere in the Handbook or anywhere in the COMAR where this approval can be found. The Administrator of Maryland DOT is provided the authority later on in the COMAR to approve all equipment for motor vehicles in Maryland. Unfortunately, once again the COMAR fails to state where this approval can be found, or how it will be determined. One would assume that the Administrator keeps a list of approved equipment including lamps, lenses, and reflectors.

However, that isn't the case. Instead the Maryland State Police have informed all the Inspection Stations to look for the raised DOT letters, which they claim is approval by the US DOT. They are wrong. The US DOT does not have the authority to approve vehicles or equipment. The US DOT, under the NHTSA, sets standards for new and imported vehicles. With regard to lights and lighting equipment they determine candle power (lumen) and color of lenses to be used. They set standards on where this equipment will be located, generally.

The raised "DOT" letters are placed on equipment by the manufacturer attesting to the manufacturer's certification that their equipment is in conformity with US law and the CFR (Code of Federal Regulations), it is not an approval by the US DOT.

Here is a letter from the Chief Counsel of the NHTSA stating that DOT raised letters do not provide approval by US DOT, on page 2, the highlighted part...US DOT Letter

What's more, there is no requirement for cars, trucks or buses in Maryland to be rejected by the inspector if "lamps, lenses or reflectors are not approved." This would seem to be discriminatory against motorcyclists, for no good reason.
can you resend the US DOT Letter that states DOT Letters do not need to be raised. Im about to go off on someone after getting this 07 883 on the dam road...
 
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