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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all,

Group riding is fun, but can be a tricky thing, especially when there are some newbies in the group. So please read the following, and give us some input. I think it's important for everyone's sake that folks adhere to these rules as much as possible.

1) Always ride in staggered formation, unless we start hitting hard twisties, then ride in single file.

2) Always show your front wheel before passing.

3) Never pass or buzz by in the same lane UNLESS waved on first.

4) Never pass during a curve or turn.

5) No stunting. I know that we are all guilty of breaking this rule, but please be reasonable about it. If'n you GOTTA show off, I suggest the following "Stunting Etiquette rules":
5)a) Move OUT of formation and lane if'n you're gonna wheelie.
5)b) After moving out of lane, move towards the FRONT of the pack.
5)c) Always make sure the group KNOWS what you're about to do.
5)d) Don't do this too often. Non-compliance will result in ostracization.
5)e) Of course, when performing ANY antics, please make SURE the group is aware of your intentions.
5)f) Absolutely NO stunting at all on the highway or when the group is larger than 6 bikes.

6) Signal lane changes with signal lights and or hand signals.

7) Signal within-lane position changes with foot signals.

8) During busy intersection turns, the second lead guy should turn wide and block traffic for the rest of the group.

9) Always ride at YOUR pace within your limits... NEVER try to keep up if'n someone is riding faster than you. Don't worry, the group will always wait at the next turn-off.

10) Positioning: Lead guy (point-man) in front, of course.
More experienced riders at or near the front.
Newbies at the rear.
"Sweep" following last.

11) Fill-up with gas BEFORE arriving at the meet.

12) If'n you get clipped, you don't know us, and we don't know you!




13) Lane-switching on the highway:
When switching lanes while riding in a large group we must follow a standard procedure. And in order to do this correctly and safely, we need RESPONSIBLE leaders, lane-holders, and sweepers.

To explain the lane-switch procedure, it's easiest to use an example. Let's say there are 10 of us in the right lane. The leader wants to change lanes.

a.) He looks, and once it's safe for him AND the number 2 rider to change lanes, he switches lanes.
The number 2 rider then switches with him. That number 2 rider is now the LANE-HOLDER.

b.) The lane-holder slows down and begins to drop back so that the number 3 rider can pass him. Once safely past the lane-holder, the number 3 rider merges into the lane behind the leader.

c.) The lane-holder continues to drop back, allowing the number 4 rider to merge in, then the number 5 rider, and so on.

d.) When it's the sweeper's turn to merge in, he does so. Then the lane-holder must show the sweeper his front wheel, and the sweeper must allow the lane-holder to pass him within the same lane, so the sweeper can resume the sweeper position.









Anyone else have anything to add? Or suggest a change? It's OK if'n you disagree with some of my suggestions... we'll discuss it, and modify as WE see fit.

Please... no off-topic posts in this thread... I think this is too important to cloud up with non-relevant stuff. Thanks.
 

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When I was new with the group, I stayed near the back until I knew what kind of riders people were.. ie. who would be riding faster than me, who not to ride behind (gas problems Michael? :twofinger ), and the group dynamic.

I'll tell you what, though. These guys are some of the best guys to be riding with. Between skill, friendship and being made fun of constantly, I can't think of better people to be hanging out with.

:confused :laughing
 

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Being a new rider (bout 6 months) myself. I felt a lot more comfortable in the back. I wasn't holding anyone up and I could go at my own pace. Course I've yet to go out with sportbikes. Everyone I've ridden with have been on Hogs. (Yes, we looked funny).
 

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Couple of things to add to the list from a guy that used to ride in large groups in NYC.

a) when riding at higher speeds or taking aggressive corners, prior to any hard braking or aggressive downshifting or slowing down my riding partners and I always used to tap the brakes a couple of times to warn the person behind us.

b) Whats do you guys use as signals for POPO warning?

c) Use foot to point out large potholes to riders behind you

d) Emergency body signal, having a emergency signal that will allow other riders to know that you have to pull over because something is wrong with your bike or something along that lines.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Uhm... I'd like to bring the following to your attention:
AaUuuuGaa! said:
Please... no off-topic posts in this thread... I think this is too important to cloud up with non-relevant stuff. Thanks.

I know that it's tempting, but please keep non-relevant material off this thread. As the originator of this thread, I will request to the mods of this section that all non-relevant posts here be deleted.

Thanks for your co-operation. :cool
 

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Fryin' Bacon Nekkid
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This is the first time I've read through this. A lot of it is right in line with what I've seen/experienced in other group rides.

One thing I might add would be that if'n you plan to leave the group ride *during* the ride (not at a stopping point) because you have to get home early, go to work, whatever, that you let the ride leader know so everyone doesn't go crazy looking for you.

One thing that I've always wondered about:

AaUuuuGaa! said:
8) During busy intersection turns, the second lead guy should turn wide and block traffic for the rest of the group.
If the blocker happens to piss off an observing LEO, or an irate cager in the blocked traffic writes down the blocker's plate, does this leave the blocker open to a "failure to yield" citation?
 

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Hi. Just lookin out for my fellow Newbies here since I am one myself, but when group riding shouldn't the Newbies be in the middle? And the pros in front and behind them? That way, the more experienced riders can keep an eye on them to make sure they're ok and also critique their riding. I haven't ridden in a group b4, but being left behind kinda freaks me out. And being a Newbie, you can't help but WANT to catch up to the group of fear of being left behind.
 

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BikeRChiC7189 said:
And being a Newbie, you can't help but WANT to catch up to the group of fear of being left behind. [/B]
Normally on the spirited rides one of the more experienced riders will ride sweeper and keep an eye on the slower riders. Let people know about your concerns when you show up for one of the rides and we will make sure someone keeps an eye on you.
 

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BikeRChiC7189 said:
Hi. Just lookin out for my fellow Newbies here since I am one myself, but when group riding shouldn't the Newbies be in the middle? And the pros in front and behind them? That way, the more experienced riders can keep an eye on them to make sure they're ok and also critique their riding. I haven't ridden in a group b4, but being left behind kinda freaks me out. And being a Newbie, you can't help but WANT to catch up to the group of fear of being left behind.

We usually like to ask less experienced riders to stay towards the back. There are a couple of reasons for this:

1) New riders to the group don't know other rider's habits and vice versa. ie: How a rider signals, do they brake late, do they take turns slower, faster, etc..

2) Less experienced riders (for the most part) take twisty roads at a lower speed. On spirited rides, some more experienced riders may want to take the turns faster. You don't want a faster rider hounding you. You'll be more likely to focus on trying to keep ahead of them and less likely to concentrate on riding within your limits.

3) Along the lines with number 2, riding towards the back you get to observe how people take turns. You can more easily follow their line/lead on less familiar roads.

4) You can ride your own pace. You won't feel like you're holding anyone up behind you. It's more of an increased comfort level. The benefit to the group is that we are less spread out. The front stays together while the rear riders can take their time.


Yes, we usually have a sweeper - a more experienced rider who is the very last person in the group. This rider usually knows where the lead is going if the group gets separated.


All of us are willing to help members ride better. Just ask and one of us will ride behind you and give you some pointers. :cool
 

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Actually another thing to consider is, do you really want someone stunting near the front, if they go down they could take out more people that way. I have had people wheelie right in front of me, which pisses me off and I almost rear ended anothe rguy because he decided to do a stoppie while the group was moving:shake

Just my ideas. I have ridden with a handful of you guys, not this past summer but the prior summer and you guys are a good group to ride with.

Tom
 

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I want to add this seemingly simple, but important, tip to the list.

While riding in formation, stagered line in one lane, only glance over your shoulder for a brief moment. Even if you know that you're still in the lane, the guy in front of you (in formation) may be doing the same thing.

Here's the specific example. I glanced over my left shoulder for more than a moment. At the same time, the rider in front of me in formation, although a bit to the left of me in the lane, also glanced over his left shoulder. We were looking for riders who had fallen behind. He couldn't see me because I was over to his right, and I couldn't see him because I had my head pointed inthe wrong direction. Sharing the same lane, niether of us looking forward, and with our speeds not matched, we eventually met side-by-side! Luckily our bikes didn't hit, but it scared me half to death.

Moral of the story; Riding in formation requires a stern attention span.
 

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some people forget the basics of staggered formation...nothing pisses me off more than having another bike parallel to mine going 70mph:rant .
 

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newbie who doesn't understand these two:

7) Signal within-lane position changes with foot signals.
do you mean if you are going to move to a different section of your lane (lets say to avoide somthing or move away from a car) you put your foot out to indicate?

8) During busy intersection turns, the second lead guy should turn wide and block traffic for the rest of the group.
Not that I would ever be in the front of the pack but what do you mean turn wide and block traffic? Are you stopping infront of the oncomming lane?

Glad to see a board for the garden state!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Karen_Michelle said:
7) Signal within-lane position changes with foot signals.
do you mean if you are going to move to a different section of your lane (lets say to avoide somthing or move away from a car) you put your foot out to indicate?
When riding in staggered formation, you shouldn't shift positions within the lane unless you have to. Sometimes the guy in front of you is an asshat and shifts over. Then you should shift as well, in order to keep staggered. And ya, you simply stick out the appropriate foot to signal this.



Karen_Michelle said:
8) During busy intersection turns, the second lead guy should turn wide and block traffic for the rest of the group.
Not that I would ever be in the front of the pack but what do you mean turn wide and block traffic? Are you stopping infront of the oncomming lane?
Basically, yes. Unless it's seems dangerous to do so. In which case, everyone makes their way through the turn on their own when it's safe for them.
 

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Just wanted to say that I was reading over your list, since I lead a lot of local rides. I think your points are SPOT ON! That's exactly the way it should be done IMO.
 

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i also too agree with all your rules, with that said...i have been stationed in Italy for the past 2.5 years with the U.S. Navy. riding here is so much different than the states all your rules posted above would have to be opposite to comply here. 1. when riding in groups, every route is a moto Gp race 2. newbies stay home 3. Italian's love to pass you really fast with their exhausts loud as hell to try and scare you 3. stunts are a MUST at every red light 4. in the twisties the fastest person gets the first cappuccino. 5. if someone gets flagged (stopped by the cops with a reflective lolly pop) the most legal person stops and all others run. 6. at the track people will pass you on the outside of a left hand turn , tap you on the leg just to tell you that you have been owned. 7. Every italian thinks they are valentino rossi (or better) 8. Ducatis are the best bike no matter what. enough said i can go on and on. in the states i would agree there is more organization, and "rules" people follow while commuting but in italy drivers in "cages" have way more respect for motorcyclists. Ie....move over into the shoulder to let you by, dont pull out in front of you at intersections, flash you when theres cops ahead (almost EVERY time), when riding in groups they move out of the road like 10 ambulances are coming. blah blah blah you all take care while riding........
 

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at the track people will pass you on the outside of a left hand turn , tap you on the leg just to tell you that you have been owned.
GOTTA love that though. OWNED!!! Great!!:crackup :crackup I'm sorry, off topic, but that WOULD crack me up. Ride safe people.
 
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