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Openside Breakaway
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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone testify as to a definite improvment in handling/traction after fitment of a tail riser (longer dog bone)? I'm thinking about buying one, but i'm not sure about the benefits for road use. Any advice would be appreciated.
 

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Looks like a YZF 600R

The bike in Omen_child's pic looks like a YZF600R, in which case you can't shim the shock mount, since it's built into the frame.

In general, additional ride height is a good thing: That'll weight the front wheel more without screwing with rake/trail too much. However, any bike's rear linkage does a lot more than set height: It's often designed to provide a progressively harder resistance to bumps in order to minimize bottoming out, and should not be screwed with lightly.

My G/F has the same bike - We didn't do the dog-bone mod, but rather ended up replacing the OEM jobbie with a Penske to increase ride height. Sandy had nothing but good things to say about the upgrade, and it's MUCH easier to adjust than my Ohlins: The adjuster is accessable and adjustable without removing the shock from it's mounting. My Ohlins has to be removed so you can spin the eyelet in/out.

If you're going to keep the OEM shock, or already have a high quality aftermarket one that doesn't happen to be length adjustable, you can try the longer/adjustable dog bone. But my advice would be keep the OEM linkage intact and replace the shock with a longer or length adjustable one.

Scott :cool
 

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I'd offer similar advice , but would suggest a Fox TC . MUCH cheaper than a Penske and functions just as well IMO . Of course , if you're mostly happy with the OEM shock but want faster steering , you could drop the forks for free or try the new linkages .
 

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joel647 said:
I'd offer similar advice , but would suggest a Fox TC . MUCH cheaper than a Penske and functions just as well IMO . Of course , if you're mostly happy with the OEM shock but want faster steering , you could drop the forks for free or try the new linkages .
check the price difference. I can get penske for just a little more than fox on most applications. check roadracing sites to get a used one, they are out there.
 

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If you can get a Penske for about the same as a Fox , then go for it . I've spent considerably less that list for my last couple TC's ( around $480 IIRC ) but the same source's lowest price for a Penske was still ~ $150 more as memory serves , though I could very well be wrong . I do recall that it was enough for me to still stay with Fox as I've had no complaints with them since 93 .

Aftermarket shocks do make a huge difference in the way a bike handles in the case of every machine I've ridden but I'm not at all familiar with the YZF600 so you may want to ask over in the Yammie forum what they've found works best . My standard advice to anyone who hasn't done so , is to go take a track school before spending $ on the bike . The questions I should have asked first are Do you feel the _need_ to make your bike steer faster and do you feel the suspension lacking or are you just interested in tinkering ?[i/] I don't mean to sound like an ass ( um , I do that a lot anyway ! ) but there's no reason to spend $$$ on something you really don't have a use for , unless you're just into tricking stuff out which is cool too . Shocks do look slick and give street cred if that's your thing too , but if that's the case I say go with Ohlins/WP/Penske :p
 

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And like the total dumbass that I am , didn't even see you're from AUS . My condolences for your countrymen that were lost in the terror attack on Bali :(


Of course , our babbling about cost and availability means little to you there !
 

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Openside Breakaway
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Discussion Starter #8
Thing is..i'm happy with the rear shock's damping qualities (rare, i know)....but what are the advantages/disadvantages of rasing ride height by replacing the linkage?
 

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There's a company here in Japan that makes very good aftermarket parts such as rearsets and shock spacers. I was able to get a set of shims installed on my bike and let me tell you it made a huge difference. 2800 Yen (about 20 bucks) for three shims. 6, 4, and 2mm sizes. I had them install all three. The initial reason was because I am 6'4" and just wanted the bike to sit up higher. Then I rode it. It dives right into the turns now. Real quick handling. Feels like a completely different bike. Thinking about dropping the front end a couple mil too. I do a lot of canyon carving here so handling is everything. Raising the tail gave me a taste, dropping the front will probably get me where I want to be.
 

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what are the advantages/disadvantages of rasing ride height by replacing the linkage?
Ummmm... The advantage is that a $50~$100 linkage part is cheaper than a good replacement shock. :rolleyes

The disadvantage is that you're screwing with how the rear suspension works in more than one way (ride height, the rising rate, and the damping curve), so it's impossible to accurately predict the outcome, and also impossible to tweak one aspect without effecting the others.

Basically, the bike will turn quicker/easier, and will resist squatting under power more if you raise the rear.

Scott :toothy
 
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